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in britain today with a second high-level resignation at scotland yard and the death of a whistleblower. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, weç get the latest on the scandal including claims of illegal eavesdropping and bribery by journalists working for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had t
a blind eye was turned at scotland yard. >> for more on this uproar and the culture which surrounds the british tabloids, i spoke with a reporter from one the best of this as a result of a unique issue with british tabloid journalism. >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you are going to get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best selling newspapers. i suppose if you imagine the national enquirer was the best- selling newspaper in america, he would have the understanding of the state of journalism here. >> what are the pressures on reporters and editors to come up with stories like this and sail close to the legal wednesday to separate >> immense. -- close to the legal winds to do this. >> demands. we are in a situation or circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers. that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line and ethical line of journalism. as we have seen with these latest revelations, hacking into the phones of murder victims, a child murder victims, it's terrible
bombing, still alive, almost two years after he was sent home from scotland with terminal cancer. al-megrahi. we found more of this supporters on the front line with the rebels. nato has not been able to get them to surrender. al has been bombing since march. nato aircraft have made more than 16,000 sorties. they have carried out more than 6000 air strikes. still, the colonel remains. four rebels in eastern libya, moammar gaddafi's fate is cause for argument. some insist he has no future inside his country. >> we understand the libyan people want him to leave the country and power, so this is our stand as of today. >> others suggest that the colonel does not have to go into exile. word that britain and france are prepared to let colonel gaddafi stay inside libya is seen by the supporters of the commonwealth as an admission that nato and the rebels cannot get rid of the libyan leader -- seen by the supporters of colonel gaddafi as an admission. giving up, long before the leader ever does. james reynolds, bbc news, in tripoli. >> you are watching "bbc world news america." still to come
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3